Llamas

 
Llamas

Our farm wouldn't be complete without our llamas. Each has special traits that make living among them entertaining, if nothing else.


Our resident spitter, is all white Dream A Little. Although most llamas will spit if indignant enough, perhaps Dream has more indigence than the rest of the herd. She lets her family know regularly when she's unhappy about such roommate issues as body space intrusions or hay hogging, by the traditional llama defense mechanism: spitting. Since spitting is primarily used to communicate exasperation with a fellow herd member's behavior, people are rarely targeted. If a person gets inadvertently caught in the cross-fire, there often seems to be a sense of contrition. "Oops, is that my green disgusting spit on your face? Sorry, wasn't meant for you, it was meant for HER, she touched me..." It may not sound like much, but when you've been the recipient, you do think twice about crossing llama boundaries again, ever. When we brought our first baby male onto the farm, he managed to violate the established (previously all female) llama courtesies constantly, in the first weeks, and always had dried green "punishment" spit all over him. He was a mess until he learned where not to put his nose.